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Salvini’s Decree Becomes Law: the Consequences

The ddl 840/2018better known as Salvini’s decree on immigration and security, has become law after approval by the Chamber of Deputies. One of the biggest changes and challenges that has come out of this decree is the removal of humanitarian protection, a lower level of asylum status provided for by Italian rather than international law – given to 25 percent of Italy’s asylum seekers last year, according to the AFP. It will also make it harder to obtain Italian citizenship and provides for the revocation of ‘acquired’ citizenship, as well as changing the rules around hosting asylum seekers in reception centres.

As an organisation that works with socially and economically disadvantaged people, female  victims of violence, and also provides accommodation – at the ‘third level’, i.e. for people who have already lived in Italy for some time and whose long-term integration we support -, we feel compelled to investigate and fully understand the implications of this legislation. As such, we held a public meeting on 30th November, in collaboration with the social enterprise Xenia who have been hosting asylum seekers for two years and with whom we share our work space. We were joined by Barbara Cattelan and Enrica Origlialawyers with ASGI (an association that studies migration legislation), who sought to analyse and interpret how the new laws will work in practice, and Monica Ceruttithe representative for Equal Opportunities in Piemonte.

So, what has changed for asylum seekers?
For anyone submitting an application now, the chances of receiving protection are greatly reduced. There is no direct long-term replacement for humanitarian protection, but some much more limited forms of protection have been introduced.

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Women seeking refuge: a crisis within a crisis

The media often speak about the refugees and asylum seekers crisis. But they rarely deal with what the female refugees endure during their journey towards the “promised land: Fortress Europe”. They are simply invisible. 

Janice G. Raymond, professor emerita of women’s studies and medical ethics, feminist, activist and former CATW Co-Director, was part of the last refugee mission in Catania with ABL, AML and Iroko to investigate the situation of women in the migration process.
The Mineo Centre – a camp for refugees, which is located outside of the town, bearing the same name – accomodates more people than its usual capacity and succeeding in providing needed assistance to the migrants and refugees, is an uphill task for the Italian Government. Many of those accomodated at the centre are female and most, if not all, are victims of violence, which they suffered during their journey towards Europe. They all live together with the other refugees and migrants waiting for their papers. Europe, however, continues to invest money on the border security, and does not give much attention to these women and their experiences.
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